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Archive for January 4th, 2012

Todays photo was a little last minute as I had a quick trawl through the local village in order to gain some inspiration. At a first glance and to the English eye it looks like many other villages. But the buildings and Church are steeped in history – a lot of it fascinating.

The picture above was taken in 1955 and can be seen larger here: http://www.francisfrith.com/upper-clatford/photos/the-village-c1955_u53008/. Francis Frith has many shots of the local village some dating back to 1899 with one of the oldest shots of All Saints- the local Church. The dullness of the day today lent itself to converting the images to black and white to hide the flaws but for the most part – I resisted.

But the shot above shows the comparison – in black and white – between the first image taken back in 1955 and indeed the differences. The street has grown, buildings have changed but the overall shape of the village has remained the same.

All Saints is a Church that, like many, that lends itself to Photography. It has a beautiful lake attached and behind it a  meadow stretches into our very own water meadow land. Upper Clatford used to be home to a Railway Track and Andovers ‘Lost Canal’ Which ran down the side of the land that the Church sits upon. Clatford itself is actually an old English word which means, ‘Ford where the Burdock Grows.’ The Church was built, it is estimated, around 1100 – 1135 and was rebuilt in the 16th and 17th century. Despite the fact that it was reconstructed to become a more auditory Church (which was a move to create ‘single room’ Churches in which altar and pulpit were seen by all) a large part of the congregation are still unable to see the altar today. The Church, like several village Churches in the area, also carries an unconfirmed history of the Bridal Gloves tradition. This involved Brides hanging their 3/4 length Wedding Gloves from the rafters until they rotted and dropped off…These parts are strange…

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